Nitsa’s Cares: School Supply Drive

Nitsa's Apparel School Supply DriveIn just a few short weeks, the lazy days of summer will come to an end, and Triad children will be returning to school. Did you know that nearly 7,000 students in Winston-Salem cannot afford the proper school supplies to help them succeed in school? Nitsa’s Apparel wants to help with this crucial need.

Now through Aug. 30, 2014, if you bring in at least $10 worth of new school supplies, you can receive 20% off your purchase at Nitsa’s. With brands like Joe’s Jeans, Lilla P, Gerry Weber, Elliott Lauren, and other designers, you can look like a million bucks without breaking the bank. Nitsa’s also carries a full line of accessories and jewelry to complete your outfits, as well as cosmetics and skin care.

Listed below are some of the school supplies that are needed:

  • Paper
  • Pencils and pens
  • Crayons
  • Markers and highlighters
  • Scissors
  • Pencil sharpeners
  • Erasers
  • Folders, binders, spiral notebooks, tab dividers, and page protectors
  • Kleenex
  • Hand sanitizer

Nitsa’s will donate all school supplies received to Winston-Salem/ Forsyth County Schools. Help these children fill their backpacks while you fill your closet with great deals on the latest styles!

Some restrictions may apply. Nitsa’s Apparel is located next to Five Points restaurant on South Stratford Road in Winston-Salem and is open Monday-Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Trunk Show Alert: Anna Maier ~ Ulla-Maija Aug. 15-16

anna maier ulla maija trunk showAnna Maier – Ulla-Maija Trunk Show in Charlotte on Aug. 15 & 16, 2014

Mark your calendar for an Anna Maier – Ulla-Maija Bridal Trunk Show at Nitsa’s Charlotte location on August 15th and 16th. Come and meet designer Charles Bunstine and see their fall 2014 collection. Appointments are suggested; call 704-940-1999 for more information.

About Anna Maier – Ulla-Maija Couture

One of the last true couture bridal houses, Anna Maier artfully crafts wedding gowns that are the ultimate in luxury. The hallmark feature of an Anna Maier gown is extravagance in all aspects of manufacture and design. The collection is recognized for its gorgeous hand draping, luxurious fabrics, and lines that flatter a woman’s body. Each gown is cut specifically to a bride’s measurements—meaning each gown, just like each bride, is truly special and unique.

Charles Bunstine Designer Anna Maier CoutoureMeet the Designer – Charles W. Bunstine II

Anna Maier Couture has been under the direction of Charles W. Bunstine II for more than a decade. The business is the expression and effort of many individuals who are  wholeheartedly committed to the founding premise of couture luxury. Mr. Bunstine has spent his lifetime directing, developing, and contributing to some of the fashion industry’s most notable companies. Mr. Bunstine’s great grandmother and her husband were master tailors who came to the U.S. in 1871 from eastern France. Her creative spirit has endured for more than a century and is now expressed in the collections of Anna Maier Couture.

Take a Sneak Peek at the Collection:

Anna Maier Couture Wedding Dress Collection

Anna Maier Coutour Wedding CollectionAnna Maier Couture Wedding Dress Collection

Austin Scarlett Trunk Show in Charlotte June 20-21

Nitsa’s is excited and honored to announce the special appearance of Austin Scarlett during our Charlotte trunk show on June 20-21. For appointments, please call 704-940-1999.Austin Scarlett

About Austin Scarlett

Austin Scarlett

Since 2005, Austin Scarlett has been living his dream, designing numerous wedding and evening gowns for women. His work is unique and creative and has been described as “magic” by the New York Times. While growing up, he dreamed of one day becoming a fashion designer. Once he was a teenager, he left his small town in Oregon to fulfill his dreams in New York City. After graduating from The Fashion Institute of Technology, Scarlett competed on the first season of Project Runway. He showed off his talent on the first challenge, creating a dress made completely out of corn husks. After Project Runway, he became one of the youngest designers in history to be named Creative Director of the Kenneth Poole Bridal Collection.

While he is known for his bridal gowns, Scarlett’s collection is perfect for debutantes! He loves helping debutantes find their breathtaking outfits to make their special day a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

This past fall, Scarlett launched his first gown collections under his own label. His collection is available at Neiman Marcus stores and other retailers, including Nitsa’s Apparel.

A Few Pieces From His Collection

First Kiss Dress by Austin ScarlettCora by Austin ScarlettMaris by Austin ScarlettPhoto Credit: NY Daily News, Austin Scarlett Website

Mother of the Groom Duties

What does the mother of the groom do?

Traditionally, mothers of brides shoulder most of the wedding-planning responsibilities. But these days, the bride and groom’s families are taking on more of a shared role in both paying and planning. This makes it a bit harder to know exactly where your place is, but despite the shift in responsibilities, there are still a few that will never go out of style for the mother of the groom. These include, but aren’t limited to:

  • Planning and hosting the rehearsal dinner with the groom’s dad.
  • Dancing with the groom for the mother/son dance at the reception.
  • Consulting with the bride’s mom on your ensemble to ensure you’re not wearing something similar.
  • Attending the bridal shower and buying a gift for the bride and groom.
  • Crafting a guest list for the reception after the couple shares how many people you’ll be able to invite.

In addition to these traditional responsibilities, mothers of grooms may be asked to become a little more involved in the planning process. A few things you may be asked to do, or you could offer to do if you’d like to be more involved, are the following:

  • Offer to serve as the main contact for wedding vendors. This is especially important if the bride doesn’t have a wedding planner or day-of coordinator, and is a great way to make an impactful contribution to the wedding day, allowing both the bride and her mother to be blissfully unaware of all the questions and concerns and fully enjoy the day.
  • Offer to help scout ceremony and reception sites based on what the bride is looking for aesthetically. Compiling a list that includes the best of the best will really help the bride narrow down all her choices. Just be wary not to overstep; it’s a definite possibility that the bride may not love the same venue you do, and though you put in a lot of ground work, it’s ultimately her decision.
  • Offer to host a dinner to introduce the bride’s family to yours. This is a great way to get to know each other before the big day, and will make working together closely on a lot of these big decisions much easier in the long run.

 

Working With a Wedding Planner

Photo source: http://www.setxweddings.com/professionals/wedding-planners/

Planning a wedding involves many moving parts. Not only are there decisions to make about the reception, there are also many to make about the ceremony: Who would’ve thought that someone actually needs to plan who will walk down the aisle, in what order, or to advise your bridesmaids on the proper way to hold a bouquet? While you can tackle some of these to-dos yourself, there are many that would be made easier with the help of a wedding planner. 

One of the best things about hiring a planner/coordinator is that this is their area of expertise. They know the ins and outs of the industry better than anyone else and are able to offer you insight and perspective that you would otherwise not have access to. From setting a timeline for the overall day, to handling the minutia of paperwork and correspondence with vendors, to helping you weigh the pros and cons of a particularly tough decision, a planner keeps you together, both emotionally and logistically.

Wedding planners and designers are also great advisors. They’ll be able to recommend the best vendors—overall or for your price range—and sometimes can even get you deals on vendors. They’re also excellent at advising you on your budget; big or small, they’ll show you how much to spend where and make sure that you don’t overspend in an area that isn’t the most important to you (i.e., if you don’t love flowers then they shouldn’t make up a large percentage of your budget). If there’s a question of etiquette, look no further than your planner for the perfect advice.

All these pluses aside, planners and coordinators are also buffers, resolving conflicts with vendors or family in your name and with ease. They’re also often your personal buffer on the wedding day, working as the point of contact for crises so you’re spared the nitty-gritty details. The extra price of a planner is a small one to pay for a perfectly-planned (and executed) wedding day.

 

 

Wedding Planning – It’s All About Timing

The big things are easy: Deciding on a budget, making the guest list, and finding a venue are all things your mind immediately gravitates to when planning your big day. But amid the obvious, there are smaller, less obvious tasks that need to be done—and need to be done at

Photo credit: http://jienani.wordpress.com/2012/04/15/wedding-checklist-to-do-list/

the appropriate time. From when to send out Save the Dates and invitations, to the final dress fitting, we’ll fill you in on when some of these lesser known to-dos are well, due.

Save the Dates and Invitations

As a general rule, invitations are sent six to eight weeks prior to your wedding day, with the RSVP postmark set for three weeks from the date the invitations were posted. If you choose to send Save the Date cards out to ensure guests will keep the date free on their calendars, you’ll want to send these out six to seven months before the wedding.

The Final Fitting

You’ll have several fittings over the course of your dress’ alterations, with the final one scheduled no sooner than one month from your wedding day. We suggest scheduling one for the week of your wedding day as well just in case you gain or lose stress weight; you can always cancel this should the dress fit perfectly one month out and your weight be staying fairly consistent.

Wear Your Wedding Shoes

It seems so obvious, to wear your wedding shoes before the big day. Yet, with the flurry of activity and the shoes tucked neatly away in a box alongside more-easily-wearable accessories, sometimes brides forget to break them in beforehand, and the results aren’t pretty. Put it on your calendar to start wearing your shoes—around the house or on unsoiled pavement, if necessary, to roughen the bottoms—a week or two before wedding day. Several sessions in your shoes and they’ll fit like a glove day-of.

 

 

 

How to Repurpose those Gowns for Halloween!

Got a closet full of old formal gowns? Here’s how to recycle those dresses into easy and awesome Halloween Costumes.  Find your color; find your costume.

Black

Morticia: from www.polyvore.com

Morticia (Addams Family) Throw on that long, black evening gown, get out your flat iron and heavily line your eyes. Add in a mustached man constantly kissing your arm for good measure.

Ursula (The Little Mermaid) Get evil like Ursula with a flowing black gown, bright red lips, teal and purple make-up, a gold pendant necklace, and a white pixie-cut wig.

Green

Medusa

Become this mythical Greek goddess with a green dress of any length, gold and green eye shadow, and crazy curls with a few toy snakes twisted in. Hisssss…

Tinkerbell (Peter Pan)

If you’ve got a short green dress, all you need is a wand, wings, and a pouch full of fairy dust to become this Neverland cutie.

Blue

Alice in Wonderland

Top a tea-length, blue dress with a white apron and add a black ribbon to your hair to get this blonde’s look. White stockings and black Mary Janes complete the costume. Top it off with a friend pointing at you and screaming, “Off with her head!” throughout the night.

Cinderella

A blue ball gown, black choker necklace,

and elbow-length white gloves will transform you into this well-loved princess. Don’t forget the clear heels or Prince Charming may not recognize you! Remember, you only have until midnight…

Red

Jessica Rabbit (Who Framed Roger Rabbit)

BettyBoop Photo: www.bettyboop.com

No need for a nurse costume here. With fiery, auburn locks and a skin-tight red evening gown, you’ll have the sexiest costume in the room, no doubt. Purple gloves and a cigarette holder finish the irresistible look.

Betty Boop

A black curly wig and a short red cocktail dress are necessary to become this cartooned gal. Throw on some big gold hoop earrings and blow lots of kisses to all the fellas. Boop-Oop-A-Doop!

Yellow

Belle (Beauty and the Beast)

Tell the tale as old as time in a yellow ball gown and elbow-length gloves. Swirl half of your hair into a high bun and let the rest fall to your shoulders. Carry a book, and be sure to waltz with someone in a wolf costume before the night is over.

Chiquita Banana Lady

Wear a yellow dress of any length, and strap a basket full of fruit to the top of your head and waa-laa! (voila) Red lips and a bit of salsa dancing top off this fruity look.

White

Marilyn Monroe

Curly blond locks, red lips, and her signature beauty mark is all your white tea-length dress needs to turn into this bombshell. Talk in a high, breathy voice and stand near a fan every now and then to strike her famous pose.

Wilma (The Flinstones)

Get prehistoric with a high, red bun, chunky white necklace, and a white cocktail dress. Shoes are discouraged for this costume, but animal print accessories fit right in!

 

Social Graces: Solving the Dress Code Guessing Game

Who, what, when—wear? Deciphering an event’s dress code from the invitation can be quite the puzzler. Luckily, most leave clues as to the event’s appropriate attire. Here are a few tips for debunking your invite:
First, look to the bottom right corner of the invitation. Sometimes the host is very helpful and will leave a note announcing the dress code directly. The only hitch with this clue is knowing the lingo. Here’s a cheat sheet:

Black Tie – Ladies: Evening gown (preferred) or fancy cocktail dress. Men: Tuxedo (preferred) or dark-colored suit and tie.
Black Tie Optional – Ladies: Evening gown, cocktail dress or fancy suit. Men: Tuxedo or dark suit and tie.
Formal – Ladies: Fancy cocktail dress or suit. Men: Dark suit and tie.
Semi-Formal – Ladies: Cocktail dress or skirt and blouse. Men: Suit and tie or khakis and blazer with tie, light or dark.
Beach Formal – Ladies: A more formal sundress and flat sandals. Men: Light summer suit and sandals. Tie optional.
Casual – Ladies: Sundress, skirt or pants and blouse. Men: Dress pants and button-down shirt or polo.

No dress code listed? No worries! Invitation style, font, and details will help you avoid a fashion faux pas. First, take a look at the invitation as a whole. Is it on heavy cardstock? Is there filigree around the edges? Are the colors and design formal? If the invitation seems fancy, it’s almost guaranteed the event will be fancy, so lean to the Semi-Formal or Formal options. If the invitation is more relaxed, has a lot of color and a picture or art in the background, it will usually be less formal so lean towards Semi-Formal or Casual.
decoding wedding dress codes
Next, look to the font and verbiage of the invitation. Elegant cursive fonts have a fancier flair compared to a basic print.  Another indicator is the language used. If it says, “request the honor of your presence,” that is much more formal than “invite you to.” If you’re not sure about the sophistication of language, judge  by
whether you would say the phrase in normal conversation. If not, it’s likely a Semi-Formal or above event.

Finally, the details included offer informative clues. What time of day is the event? Daytime events (before 5p.m.) are less formal and, depending on the season, warmer, so lighter, more casual attire is appropriate. If the event takes place after 5 p.m., it likely falls in the Semi-Formal or above category. Another great clue is the location. A country club offers much fancier surroundings than a barn, and thus, guests’ attire will follow suit.

Still unsure? Ask someone closely involved with the event, so long as it’s not the bride, and, as a final rule of thumb: It’s better to be overdressed than underdressed.

Photo: Invite from etsy.com SincerelyJackie shop